Book review. Craft and the Creative Economy by Susan Luckman.

9781137399649

In Craft and the Creative Economy, Susan Luckman looks at the rise of the craft entrepreneur and the growth of the handmade economy as an Internet-driven phenomenon. This is an appealing look at the renewed trend towards craft and making that gives valued attention to both the role of digital networks and the gendered and classed implications of this particular aspect of the contemporary creative industries, writes Paz Concha

This post was originally published in the LSE Review of Books Blog.

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Privatisation of street food markets in London: curating markets and place.

Berwick Street Market, Soho. Photo credit: Vlondons

In a recent edition of The Guardian, there was a story about the privatisation of Berwick street Market, an historic London market in the heart of Soho. Stallholders are protesting for the Council’s decision to bring in a “commercial operator” to manage the market. Why would the Council would do that? Not only for efficiency reasons, but as a councillor mentions, the market needs to “wash its face”. Bringing in a market organiser for Berwick Street is a way of changing the look and feel of the market and the area; as a market campaigner says in the article “the reinvention of markets has got to be done in a curated way”.

This post was originally published in Researching Sociology @ LSE

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Book Review. The Creative Citizen Unbound… edited by Ian Hargreaves and John Hartley

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Drawing upon the findings of a 30-month research project, The Creative Citizen Unbound: How Social Media and DIY Culture Contribute to Democracy, Communities and the Creative Economy, edited by Ian Hargreaves and John Hartley, explores the potential of civic-minded individuals to participate in ‘creative citizenship’ by utilising social media and engaging with the creative economy. Although she would have welcomed more detailed discussion of the book’s guiding concepts, Paz Concha recommends its wealth of case studies and examples to academics and practitioners looking to enhance their research impact or build strategies for knowledge exchange.

This post was originally published in the LSE Review of Books Blog.

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